Are you ready for Thanksgiving?

Life is about family and friends, and Thanksgiving is an opportunity to gather around a meal with the ones we love the most.

With Thanksgiving just around the corner, we wanted to remind everybody that we’ll be celebrating with our families as well.

We’ll be closed Thursday, November 28 and Friday, November 29. We’ll be back in the office on Monday, December 2. We look forward to serving you this holiday season.

Yunhee Min & Peter Tolkin, “Red Carpet in C,” at UCR Arts

It’s not always “business as usual” here at Spiral Paper Tube & Core. We recently had the opportunity to work with two greats, Yunhee Min, an artist, and architect Peter Tolkin, both working in collaboration with the University of California, Riverside.

Unlike most other custom orders, theirs called for thousands of light blue paper tubes, dark blue paper tubes, bright yellow paper tubes, forest green paper tubes, followed by an array of pinks, reds and oranges…all with a clean, flat white inside liner.

In addition to the fluctuating colors, the lengths were just as varied.

After numerous intriguing conversations, we felt we had an understanding of their project and began bringing in the custom colored paper. And, truth be told, the colors lit up our factory like never before!

Here’s the what the LA Times had to say about their art installation:

Inspired by the writings of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, who described music as “liquid architecture” and architecture as “frozen music,” Min and Tolkin have created an installation that fills the UCR Arts atrium with an undulating form constructed out of 150-foot bands of fabric and more than 17,000 colored paper tubes. 

The installation runs through December 29. The opening reception was held September 29 at UC Riverside, 3824 and 3834 Main St., Riverside, ucrarts.ucr.edu

“Yunhee Min & Peter Tolkin: Red Carpet in C is a collaboration between painter, Yunhee Min, and architect, Peter Tolkin. The idea for this project evolved out of Min and Tolkin’s shared enthusiasm for music, architecture, and color. These interests let them to Goethe who described the relationship between architecture and music as “Music is liquid architecture; Architecture is frozen music.”

Conceived as performative architecture, this large fabric installation functions as both an object to be viewed and a space to be inhabited; a virtual translation of music into three-dimensions. Constructed of fabric and colored paper tubes, its soft, undulating parabolic shape is set in visual relief against the classical proportions, meter, and time signature of Culver Center of the Arts’ historic atrium.

Yunhee Min & Peter Tolkin: Red Carpet in C is organized by the Barbara & Art Culver Center of the Arts at UCR ARTS and is co-curated by Tyler Stallings and Zaid Yousef. Yunhee Min & Peter Tolkin: Red Carpet in C has been possible with support from the National Endowment for the Arts, the University of California Institute for Research in the Arts, Spiral Paper Tube & Core, Francine Tolkin Cooper and Herbert Cooper, Susan and Jim Crawford, Clara and Tim Daniels, Freya and Mark Ivener, Avery and Miles McEnery, Marla and Jeffrey Michaels, Laurie and Marc Recordon, Jonathan Tolkin, and Barbara H. Hirsch. UCR’s College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences and the City of Riverside provide support for UCR ARTS programs.

 

The team that made possible Red Carpet in C

 

TOLO Architecture participants include Peter Tolkin, Sarah Lorenzen, Socrates Medina, Karl Kachele, Kare Tonapetyan, Parker Amman, Jeremy Schacht, Trenman Yau, Chelsea Rector, and Karl Blette.

 

Matthew Melnyk from Nous Engineering

 

Robert K. Williams from UCR Architects and Engineers

 

Cal Poly Pomona Architecture (CPP ARC) students included Athenna Ann Lim, Yewon Hong, Romi Ann Grepo, Victor Daniel Macias, Emily To, Cheyenne Capener, Vi Phan, Stephanie Contreras, Stephanie Toro, Chelsea Steiner, Paola Murillo, Karla Vich, Julie Habib, Kenza Abourraja, Karen Venegas, Jose Luis Hernandez, Grace Liu, Rusxanne Londonio, Son Vu, Osvaldo Guiterrez Munoz, Sam Rubio, Sharifeh Diabdallah, Amaris Vasquez, Joseph Nandino, Emily Bandy, William Tan, Emily Ta, and Karla Camarena.
UCR ARTS team included Zaid Yousef, co-curator and exhibition designer, Cody Norris, senior preparator, Tim LeBlanc, assistant preparator, and Grace Saunders, preparator, along with Rene Balingit Jr., Samuel Cantrell, Ivy Son, and Jennifer Rodriguez Trujillo, along with guest co-curator Tyler Stallings.” – UCR Arts

Summertime packaging tips

The US economy is on the up and up. Manufacturing is increasing. How has that impacted your supply chain?

Here are 3 packaging tips to consider this summer:

  1. Pay attention to the details on the front end
  2. Overestimate the amount of time it will take for your custom order to get delivered
  3. Make sure your invoices are paid on time

1. Pay attention to the details on the front end

When an inexperienced buyer is in a hurry for a custom order, they express a variety of emotions. The more emotions expressed, the fewer details they pay attention to. Have you ever noticed that grumpy people tend to spot every single little problem? Don’t let your client’s emotions distract you. Remain focused on the details: product, style, size, dimensions, color, material, shipping details, and payment terms.

If you are going into this order already in a time crunch, the last thing you want is to overlook an important detail, manufacture the order incorrectly, and end up having to make it again. This will only cost you more time and more of your money. If needed, have a coworker double-check the purchase order and details to confirm accuracy.

2. Overestimate the amount of time it will take for your custom order to get delivered

If you have a product getting ready to go to market, and the packaging is the last component you’re waiting on, give yourself plenty of time. Manufacturing is increasing across the board and, as a result, lead times and turnaround times are getting extended.

Budgeting a little extra time on the front end, will help you avoid having to expedite shipments unnecessarily. Sure, you can air freight that LTL shipment, but what does that do to your bottom line? Extra time will also come in handy in case the manufacturer makes a mistake, uses the wrong color, or something as simple as their shipping guy calls out sick the day your shipment is supposed to go out.

Manufacturing lead time +  shipping time + a little extra time = your best bet

3. Make sure your invoices are paid on time

Paying your bills on time is not just the best way to conduct business, it will benefit you in the long run. If your company has terms (an open account) with vendors, but doesn’t pay within the time period agreed upon, you establish a poor business reputation with your vendors. As unsecured creditors, they become hesitant-maybe you’ll pay late again…but maybe you won’t pay at all this time?

Make a conscious effort to always pay your bills early or on time. This will help establish a positive, trusting working relationship with vendors. Then, when that time comes when you’re in a hurry, made an internal mistake, or just need a favor, the positive reputation you’ve established and maintained over the years will pay off.

Don’t be that person who doesn’t ever seem to pay on time, but always seems to be in a rush or needing something obscure.

Made in America. Since 1949.

 

As you may have already seen, this week is #MadeInAmerica week!

As a family owned and operated company, we’re joining the rest of this nation’s manufacturers! Since 1949, the Hibard family has been manufacturing paper packaging products in Los Angeles.

We take pride in our products and are proud to say we make everything here in Los Angeles.

Here are a few of our most popular products:

  • Mailing Tubes
  • Poster Tubes
  • Paper Cores
  • Edge Protectors
  • Corner Protectors
  • Fiber Cans & Telescope Tubes
  • Concrete Form Tubes
  • Custom Paper Tubes
  • Litho Display Poles

Learn more about Spiral Paper Tube & Core’s history here:

 

#MadeInAmerica

Four Years Later

It’s been four years since we launched our e-commerce store!

We’ve been manufacturing paper tubes since 1949, but it wasn’t until 2013 we decided to take the plunge.

Our turnaround times have always been a significant factor in our customers’ purchasing decisions.

Conversation after conversation, the feedback was consistent: we need our paper cores faster.

We put our heads together, implemented a few new changes and created solutions to give our paper core customers just what they were looking for:

Same Day Shipping

In 2013, we launched our e-commerce store with a handful of 3″ ID (inside diameter) x .125″ thick paper cores. Since then, we’ve increased to over 90 different lengths.

The process couldn’t be simpler:

  1. order before 11 AM Pacific
  2. orders ship UPS that same day

Our customers are pleased, and so are our new ones. The feedback we’re receiving now is different, but still consistent: thank you.

 

The History of Spiral Paper Tube & Core – Los Angeles

After returning from World War II, George Hibard Sr., a Wisconsin native, set out to pursue his American dream when he started Spiral Paper Tube & Core in 1949.

A machinist by trade, and a USC Marshall School of Business student by night, Mr. Hibard designed, engineered and fabricated most of the machinery used to produce his first spiral paper tubes.

For the first 55 years, Spiral Paper Tube & Core was located at 8802 South Graham, Los Angeles, CA 90002.

George Hibard Jr., an inventor and economist, followed in the footsteps of his father and became President in the 1990s.

Within ten years, George had quickly increased the number of product lines to eight, including Edge Protectors, one of Spiral Paper Tube & Core’s most popular products.

In 2004, Spiral Paper Tube & Core moved its headquarters from South Los Angeles to its current location, 5200 Industry Avenue, Pico Rivera, CA 90660.

After 68 years in business, we continue to value quality, excellence, honesty and integrity. Our diverse product line is reaching farther and servicing more industries now than any time before.

Many of the employees that worked for Mr. Hibard are still with us today. And it is not uncommon for an old-time customer or vendor to call the office and share a few stories about the good ole days with the younger staff. We believe genuine connection best compliments our quality packaging products—it is our way of best serving you.

Top 10 Halloween Costumes with Paper Tubes

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Every October, parents and party-goers alike are faced with this question: What should I dress up as for Halloween?

Like everybody else, we appreciate a unique costume. But, we’re biased. We like costumes that use paper tubes.

Earlier this month, we set out to find our favorite Halloween costumes with paper tubes. We selected our favorite Halloween costumes based on the following criteria:

  1. creativity
  2. uniqueness
  3. use of materials

After scouring the internet, Etsy, and Pinterest, here’s our top 10 favorite halloween costumes.

The paper tube octopus…

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The paper tube minions…

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The paper tube explorer…

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The paper tube mech warrior…

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The paper tube mac-n-cheese boy…

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Baby boy lumber jack with paper tube ax…

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The human frappucino with whipped cream and paper tube straw…

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The human toilet paper holder…

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The painter with paper tube paint brush…

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And lastly, the paper tube R2D2…

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We hope you enjoyed our top 10 paper tube Halloween costumes as much as we did!

If you’ve used a paper tube (toilet paper tube, wrapping paper tube, paper towel tube, concrete form tube, etc.) for any of your Halloween costumes, we want to see pictures!

Post your pictures on our Facebook page.

Think You Have Tube Knowledge?

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Paper Tubes. It’s what we do.

Last year, we set out to educate as many people as possible by launching our Knowledge Base.

We had noticed that many of our clients, packaging distributors, curious minds, builders, crafters, retail shop owners, tape and label makers, printers, freight companies, artists, architects, poster companies, etc. all seemed to be asking us the same questions.

Although paper tubes are structurally the same (they all look like a toilet paper tube, with a twirling seam), they’re used in a variety of applications. And depending on how the paper tube was being used, we were able to predict what questions might be asked by somebody in that field.

For that reason, we created our Knowledge Base – a collection of paper tube-specific articles, Q&As, and other helpful information.

For example, an artist who designs and ships custom posters on Etsy will have questions specifically related to packing and shipping poster tubes.

 

3 Common Mailing Tube Questions:

  1. When both plastic end plugs are inserted, how much does each Mailing Tube weigh?
  2. What size Mailing Tube should I use for my poster?
  3. What’s the difference between “overall length” and “outside diameter” and “inside length” and “inside diameter?”

 

Another example is a tape or label manufacturer. Instead of using a plain kraft brown paper core, they may want their company logo printed on the inside. Their product will be wrapped around the outside of the paper core, leaving valuable real estate on the inside. Their questions about printing will be completely different than the artist selling posters on Etsy.

 

4 Common Printing Questions:

  1. Can you print our logo in a specific color?
  2. What’s the difference between Pantone colors and GCMI colors?
  3. Will our ink color look best on kraft brown paper or flat white paper?
  4. What file type and size do we need to send?

 

These questions are just two examples of the types of questions we regularly receive. If you’d like to learn more about paper tubes, take a stroll around our Knowledge Base.

You may already be familiar with many of the Knowledge Base topics. But then again, you may walk away with a greater understanding of paper tubes.

Explore our Knowledge Base and increase your tube knowledge today!

The average American uses 8 paper tubes a day…all without knowing.

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Admit it.

You’ve hit at least one unsuspecting person with a wrapping paper tube at least once in your life.

Probably more.

Did you know the average American uses 8 paper tubes a day…all without knowing? It’s true. All of us here at Spiral Paper Tube dedicate our lives to making products most will never think twice about. Let alone think once about.

Our most popular tubes and cores are hidden in plain sight.

They’re inside holiday wrapping paper, rolls of toilet paper, kitchen paper towels and Scotch tape. Most consumers don’t set out to buy our paper tubes and paper cores directly, so their interaction with our product goes something like this:

  • use all of the wrapping paper, toilet paper, paper towels, or Scotch tape
  • throw paper tube in recycle bin
  • the end

If you’re a parent of small children, or a teacher, it might go something more like this:

  • ask others to intentionally use up all of their wrapping paper, toilet paper, paper towels, or Scotch tape
  • collect their paper tubes and cores
  • use scissors, glue, glitter, construction paper, yarn, paint, and popsicle sticks to make crafts
  • the end

As you can see, parents, kids, teachers and students are having a bit more fun with our products than the average consumer. For this reason, we want to have a little fun this next month.

This summer, we want to see your crafts and inventions!

When you, your kids, or your students create something with a paper tube, post it on our Facebook Page or use #ilovetubes when you post it on Twitter or Instagram!

And for those that may not be too crafty, if you spot a paper tube or paper core in a retail shop, on the street, at a post office, etc. you can join in also!

With your help, we can bring those 8 paper tubes a day into the spotlight and remind America just how fun paper tubes can be!

Paper Tubes and Plastic Plugs Go Together Like Peanut Butter and Jelly

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Some things are just meant to be together…

What would peanut butter be without jelly? Who would Batman be without Robin? How lonely would salt feel without pepper?

Paper tubes are no different. Without friction-fit plastic plugs, banners, posters and prints would simply slide right out of our mailing and shipping tubes. An end closure is needed, and there are a few different ways to secure the ends of paper tubes. White plastic plugs are the go-to option.

Friction-fit plastic plugs are made with virgin plastic.

This is important because plastic plugs made with virgin content are stronger and more durable than plugs made with recycled material. It also ensures a clean, white looking plug. White plastic plugs made with highly recycled content are easily noticed because they appear spotted and “dirty.”

Plastic plugs have 2 prominent features:

  • pull tab
  • ribbed-sides

The pull tab allows the plastic plug to be easily removed while the ribbed sides push against the paper tube’s inside walls and help keep it in place. These two features, and economical pricing, make it the most commonly used end closure.